FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ's)

1. What to expect on your first visit.
2. What is Sports Massage Therapy?
3. What is Pilates Rehabilitation?
4. What is Remedial Massage Therapy?
5. What Techniques are used in Sports Therapy?
6. What is Clinical Sports Therapy?
7. What is Dry Needling
8. What is Personal Training?


1. WHAT TO EXPECT ON YOUR FIRST VISIT

You will be asked for your medical history details. This helps determine treatment priorities. Perhaps your treatment is an attempt to break the stress cycle or, maybe, easing out the main areas of tightness is your priority.

No doubt your problems will have built up over time, so please do not expect just one or two treatments to help overcome your condition. Be patient and regular with treatment, in particular, with work cover claims and treatment plans.

Therapists will not require you to remove your underwear, although most massage techniques require that you be at least partially undressed. All areas of the body (except the part being worked on) are covered with towels (or as much as is practicable) or you will be asked to dress in a clinic gown.

Let your therapist know if you are experiencing too much pain during the session as sometimes the treatment may be too intense for you. If this is the case, tell your Therapist and they can adjust the intensity. Feedback is always welcome.


2. WHAT IS SPORTS MASSAGE THERAPY?

Sports Massage is a special form of massage and is typically used before, during and after athletic events. The purpose of the massage is to prepare the athlete for peak performance to reduce muscle tension, to promote flexibility and lessen chances of injury (and reduce recovery time).

The main purpose of Sports Massage Therapy is to help alleviate the stress and tension which builds up in the body’s soft tissues during physical activity. Where minor injuries and lesions occur, due to over-exertion and/or overuse, massage can break them down quickly and effectively.

A variety of techniques are used involving Swedish Massage and Shiatsu, specifically designed to treat professional athletes.

In addition to feeling good, sports massage reduces the heart rate and blood pressure, increases circulation and lymph flow.


3. WHAT IS PILATES REHABILITATION?

Using Pilates for rehabilitation, works for many reasons. The great attention to detail and form is a perfect way for a client to gain strength in the weaker or injured muscle or joints. Pilates is gentle on the joints, so there is little worry over-stressing an already stressed body. It also develops the smaller muscle groups that work to support joints and boney structures, and because Pilates builds a bodily awareness to balance, chronically weak and imbalanced muscles become equally strong.


4. WHAT IS REMEDIAL/SPORTS MASSAGE THERAPY?

Remedial/Sports Therapy helps reduce the risk of fibrosis and adhesions in muscle and fascia. It can also help relax muscles and reduce tension. Relief can be gained from cramps and spasms, and rehabilitation after injury can be enhanced. Circulation can be stimulated. Remedial massage can stretch contracted muscles and increase function for sufferers of Repetitive Strain Syndrome. Remedial/Sports Therapists specialise in:

  • Back & neck pain

  • Shoulder and neck tension

  • Tension headaches & migraines

  • Improved body alignment

  • Sciatica, hip & lower back pain

  • Over-use injuries

  • Injury recovery

  • Improved flexibility & range of motion


    5. WHAT TECHNIQUES ARE USED IN SPORTS THERAPY?

  • Ultrasound Therapy

  • Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS)

  • Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS)

  • Interferential (IF)

  • Microcurrent (Mic)

  • Deep Tissue Massage

  • Soft Tissue Massage

  • Trigger Point Therapy

  • Dry Needling

  • Myofascial release

  • Lymphatic drainage

  • Positional Release

  • Muscle Energy Techniques

  • Sports Taping

    6. WHAT IS CLINICAL SPORTS THERAPY?

    Sports Therapy utilises many techniques, including massage, to address a wide range of soft tissue problems and is designed for patients who have injured their muscles, ligaments, tendons and other soft tissues eg carpel tunnel syndrome, headaches, neck tension, whiplash, lower back pain, tendonitis and general muscle tension and pain.

    Treatments can dramatically reduce pain and discomfort and assist in the body’s natural healing process and circulation. Whether it is stress (work related or work cover claims related), or injury from leisure or sport, remedial therapy can assist people of all ages.


    7. WHAT IS DRY NEEDLING?

    Acupuncture and dry needling, while using the same needle types, are two very different treatments. Traditional Acupuncture is used for the diagnosis and treatment of pathological conditions including visceral and systemic dysfunction, while dry needling is used for the assessment and treatment of myofacial pain syndromes and dysfunction due to myofacial trigger points / tension areas / muscle spasm / increased tonicity.

    Acupuncture achieves pain relief through the release of endorphins and creating balance in the body's energy levels. Through the release of serum cortisol acupuncture can also have an anti-inflammatory effect.

    Dry needling also acts via the release of endorphins and serum cortisol but also achieves pain relief and biomechanical re-function by de-activating the trigger points at the muscle cell level and thus eliminating the nociceptive focus of the muscle. The needles also cause localised haemorrhaging which promotes healing by stimulating collagen and protein formation.


    8. WHAT IS PERSONAL TRAINING?

    A Personal Trainer is a fitness professional involved in exercise prescription, who motivates clients by setting goals and providing feedback and accountability to their clients.

    Trainers also measure their client’s strengths and weaknesses with fitness assessments.
    Proper exercise prescription may result in improved body composition, physical performance and health outcomes.




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